Why is it important to encourage boys to work hard in Scouting?

Baylor University did a survey of Eagle Scouts, men who had been scouts as a youth, and men who’d never participated in scouting. (Full Study here — http://www.baylorisr.org/wp-content/uploads/Boy-Scouts-Report.pdf)

Some of the findings were not very surprising, but others were noteworthy enough for me to feel compelled to post this to our blog.

Take a look at the following conclusions from the study (23 out of 46 total, or half of those reported in the full study) and think about how important they are considering how easy it can be for men in today’s society to become disconnected from their own families and worship centers due to work/stressors/sports/etc. 

Eagles are more likley to:

  1. Have extremely close relationships with friends: Eagle Scouts are 60 percent more likely compared to Scouts. Further, Eagle Scouts are also 37 percent more likely to be extremely close with friends, compared to those men who never participated in Boy Scouts.
  2. Have talked with or visited with neighbors at least once per month: Eagle Scouts are 36 percent more likely compared to Scouts. Moreover, Eagle Scouts are 46 percent more likely to have interacted with immediate neighbors at least once per month than men who never participated in Boy Scouts.
  3. Belong to at least four formal or informal groups: The likelihood of Eagle Scouts is 54 percent greater than Scouts. Additionally, Eagle Scouts are 87 percent more likely than non-Scouts to belong to at least four formal or informal groups.
  4. Have donated money to a religious institution within the last month: Eagle Scouts are 53 percent more likely than non-Scouts but are not significantly different from other Scouts in donating money to a religious institution.
  5. Volunteer time to a religious organization: Eagle Scouts are approximately 55 percent more likely, compared to other Scouts. Also, Eagle Scouts are 66 percent more likely than non-Scouts to volunteer time to a religious organization.
  6. Volunteer their time to a non-religious organization: Eagle Scouts are 58 percent more likely than other Scouts. In addition, Eagle Scouts are 62 percent more likely than non-Scouts to volunteer time to a non-religious organization.
  7. Work with their neighbors to address a problem or improve something: Compared to Scouts, Eagle Scouts are 68 percent more likely . Also, Eagle Scouts are 56 percent more likely than non-Scouts to work with others in their neighborhood to address a problem or improve something.
  8. Have held a leadership position at their workplace: Eagle Scouts are roughly 39 percent more likely than other Scouts and approximately 55 percent more likely than non-Scouts.
  9. Have held leadership positions in the local community: Compared to Scouts, Eagle Scouts are about 53 percent more likely. Moreover, Eagle Scouts are around 76 percent more likely than non-Scouts to have held leadership positions in the local community.
  10. Be active in a group that works to protect the environment: Eagle Scouts are 89 percent more likely than other Scouts and 92 percent more likely than non-Scouts.
  11. Avoid using products that harm the environment: Compared to Scouts, Eagle Scouts are 38 percent more likely. Further, Eagle Scouts are 31 percent more likely than men who have never been Scouts to say they avoid using products that harm the environment.
  12. Feel it is extremely important to learn something every day: Eagle Scouts are 42 percent more likely than other Scouts. Further, Eagle Scouts are 40 percent more likely to believe it is extremely important to learn something every day, compared to those men who never participated in Boy Scouts.
  13. Report taking a course or class in the past year: Eagle Scouts are 30 percent more likely than Scouts. Eagle Scouts are 80 percent more likely than non-Scouts to report taking a course or class in the past year.
  14. Report achieving a personal goal in the last year: Eagle Scouts are 39 percent more likely than Scouts. Eagle Scouts are also 64 percent more likely than non-Scouts to report they achieved a personal goal in the last year.
  15. Report they achieved a professional goal in the last year: Eagle Scouts are roughly 29 percent more likely than non-Scouts.
  16. Indicate they achieved a spiritual goal in the last year: Eagle Scouts are about 81 percent more likely than other Scouts and 81 percent more likely than non-Scouts.
  17. Report achieving a financial goal in the last year: Eagle Scouts are 57 percent more likely than other Scouts. Also, Eagle Scouts are 49 percent more likely than non-Scouts to say a financial goal was achieved in the last year.
  18. Have a disaster supply kit in their home: Eagle Scouts are 94 percent more likely than other Scouts. Also, Eagle Scouts are 124 percent more likely than non-Scouts to have a disaster supply kit kept in the home.
  19. Report a kit with emergency supplies is kept in their car: Eagle Scouts are 43 percent more likely than other Scouts. Moreover, Eagle Scouts are 81 percent more likely than non-Scouts to report a kit with emergency supplies is kept in their car.
  20. Have a specific meeting place for family to reunite in an emergency: Eagle Scouts are 94 percent more likely than other Scouts and 100 percent more likely than non-Scouts.
  21. Have CPR certification: Eagle Scouts are 50 percent more likely than other Scouts. Also, Eagle Scouts are 90 percent more likely than non-Scouts to have CPR certification.
  22. Agree they always try to exceed expectations: Eagle Scouts are 54 percent more likely than other Scouts. Additionally, Eagle Scouts are 52 percent more likely than non-Scouts to agree they always try to exceed.
  23. Say respecting religious leaders outside of your religion is at least somewhat important: Eagle Scouts are 133 percent more likely than other Scouts and 109 percent more likely than non-Scouts.

Scouting IS fun, but its much more than that.  It is a curriculum that, when executed properly, requires the boys to run the program themselves (under the guidance of adult leaders).  This helps them to learn key skills, develop character traits and learn to lead others through practical experiences.

Troop 113 has an added distinctive in that we are a faith-based troop — a place where we tailor the scouting program to the faith of our Chartering Organization, First Baptist Church of Hackensack. 

We need even more fathers to engage on a regular basis — many of our current troop dads have very difficult work schedules including shift work, pastoring on weekends, and providing consumer services that demand they be at work during weekends.  These dads have made sacrifices to support their sons and the unit, but we could always use more parents for transportation, chaperones, and merit badge counselors!  The investment pays huge dividends later in life for those scouts who commit to the program.

Paul Farrell
Scoutmaster & Eagle Scout
Troop 113
FBC of Hackensack
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About Troop113

Our Troop # comes from Psalm 1:1-3 - describing the men we want our scouts to become
This entry was posted in Devotional, Leadership, News Item and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Why is it important to encourage boys to work hard in Scouting?

  1. Kelli Yanez says:

    Thank you for sharing your Blog with us. Peter is working on his Eagle and this Blog has been passed to our troop. Keep up the great blogging and God Bless you!! What company did you use to make this blog?
    Kelli Yanez
    Advancement Coordinator
    Tropp 2678

  2. Pingback: National Eagle Scout Day (August 1) | Troop 113's Blog

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