Aims & Methods of Scouting

All levels of the Scouting program share three specific objectives (aims): Character development, Citizenship training, and Personal fitness.

  • Character – BSA states: “One is growth in moral strength and character. We may define this as what the boy is himself; his personal qualities, his values, his outlook.”

In our faith-based, Christ-centered troop, we will encourage our scouts to work with their parents, pastors, and finally troop volunteers, to refine “Moral Strength and Character” to “Biblical Strength and Character”

  • Citizenship – BSA states: “A second is participating citizenship. Used broadly, citizenship means the boy’s relationship to others. He comes to learn obligations to other people, to the society he lives in, and to the government that presides over that society.”
  • Fitness – BSA states: “A third aim of Boy Scouting is development of physical, mental, and emotional fitness. Fitness includes the body (well-tuned and healthy), the mind (able to think and solve problems), and the emotions (self-control, courage, and self-respect).”

The methods by which the aims are achieved are listed below in random order to emphasize the equal importance of each.

  • Patrols: The patrol method gives Boy Scouts an experience in group living and participating citizenship. It places responsibility on young shoulders and teaches boys how to accept it. The patrol method allows Scouts to interact in small groups where members can easily relate to each other. These small groups determine troop activities through elected representatives.
  • Ideals: The ideals of Boy Scouting are spelled out in the Scout Oath, the Scout Law, the Scout motto, and the Scout slogan. The Boy Scout measures himself against these ideals and continually tries to improve. The goals are high, and as he reaches for them, he has some control over what and who he becomes.
  • Outdoor Programs: Boy Scouting is designed to take place outdoors. It is in the outdoor setting that Scouts share responsibilities and learn to live with one another. In the outdoors the skills and activities practiced at troop meetings come alive with purpose. Being close to nature helps Boy Scouts gain an appreciation for the beauty of the world around us. The outdoors is the laboratory in which Boy Scouts learn ecology and practice conservation of nature’s resources.
  • Advancement: Boy Scouting provides a series of surmountable obstacles and steps in overcoming them through the advancement method. The Boy Scout plans his advancement and progresses at his own pace as he meets each challenge. The Boy Scout is rewarded for each achievement, which helps him gain self-confidence. The steps in the advancement system help a Boy Scout grow in self-reliance and in the ability to help others.

(Additional information about advancement quoted from: Advancement Policies #33088, pages 24)

“A Boy Scout advances from Tenderfoot to Eagle by doing things with his patrol and his troop, with his leaders, and on his own. It’s easy for him to advance if the following four opportunities are provided for him.”

1. The Boy Scout learns. “A Scout learns by doing. As he learns, he grows in ability to do his part as a member of the patrol and the troop. As he develops knowledge and skill, he is asked to teach others; and in this way he begins to develop leadership.”

2. The Boy Scout is tested. “A Scout may be tested on rank requirements by his patrol leader, Scoutmaster, assistant Scoutmaster, a troop committee member, or a member of his troop. The Scoutmaster maintains a list of those qualified to give tests and to pass candidates. The Scout’s merit badge counselor teaches and tests on the requirements for merit badges.”

3. The Boy Scout is reviewed. “After a Scout has completed all requirements for a rank, he has a board of review. For Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life, and Eagle Palms, the review is conducted by members of the troop committee. The Eagle Scout board of review is conducted in accordance with local council procedures.”

4. The Boy Scout is recognized. “When the board of review has certified a boy’s advancement, he deserves to receive recognition as soon as possible. This should be done at a ceremony at the next troop meeting. The certificate for his new rank may be presented later at a formal court of honor.

  • Associations with Adults: Boys learn a great deal by watching how adults conduct themselves. Scout leaders can be positive role models for the members of the troop. In many cases a Scoutmaster who is willing to listen to boys, encourage them, and take a sincere interest in them can make a profound difference in their lives.
  • Personal Growth: As Boy Scouts plan their activities and progress toward their goals, they experience personal growth. The Good Turn concept is a major part of the personal growth method of Boy Scouting. Boys grow as they participate in community service projects and do Good Turns for others. Probably no device is as successful in developing a basis for personal growth as the daily Good Turn. The religious emblems program also is a large part of the personal growth method. Frequent personal conferences with his Scoutmaster help each Boy Scout to determine his growth toward Scouting’s aims.
  • Leadership Development: The Boy Scout program encourages boys to learn and practice leadership skills. Every Boy Scout has the opportunity to participate in both shared and total leadership situations. Understanding the concepts of leadership helps a boy accept the leadership role of others and guides him toward the citizenship aim of Scouting.
  • Uniform: The uniform makes the Scout troop visible as a force for good and creates a positive youth image in the community. Boy Scouting is an action program, and wearing the uniform is an action that shows each Scout’s commitment to the aims and purposes of Scouting. The uniform gives the Scout identity in a world brotherhood of youth who believe in the same ideals. The uniform is practical attire for Boy Scout activities and provides a way for Boy Scouts to wear the badges that show what they have accomplished.
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4 Responses to Aims & Methods of Scouting

  1. Matthew Hilton, J.D., Ph.D. says:

    Absolutely loved your Troop blog and web-site. Intend tot refer to it in adult training.

    Matt Hilton, Scouting volunteer
    matthilton3@gmail.com

  2. Pingback: When scouting is in the blood, under the skin and hardwired | Troop 113's Blog

  3. Darryl says:

    Can I repost this in the Duty to God section of the Voice of Scouting–it is excellent!

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